1/20 FSB: RMX-000X Raptor X Part 4


This one took more time than usual with me deciding on what joint to use (aside from having a class early this week and the previous week). It would have been simple with a ball and socket joint, but since this is going to be a resin kit, I anticipated a few problems on my part with the lack of available add-ons I have in my stash. Also, I prefer hinge/swivel joints anytime.

With that in mind, I needed intermediary parts that would bring the leg, the ankle and the foot together.

Say Ankle!

The ankle intermediary is a simple "catch" that joins the leg to the ankle. I sawed slits to the lower leg joints' "cheeks." This is where the ankle intermediary will slide onto, locking the leg joints in turn.

Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image

Posted Image


Footloose!

The foot is made of several parts that interlock. The heel is a simple two-part slide assembly, that will connect to the "core" of the foot via pegs on either side.

Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image

Posted Image


The core sandwiches the heel, and the main foot locks the core with a three-piece assembly, and finally by the fool intermediary. As planned, the foot is similar to a raptor's foot in walker mode, and folds onto itself in flight mode.

Posted Image

I wasn't able to take step-by-step pictures of the main ankle joint, but it's also a three-piece assembly that is interlocked by the ankle intermediary via pegs.

Posted Image
Posted Image

I've also made a video of the Ankle and Foot assembly.




Next up, the shin armor. This also took a bit of time thinking about how to execute it, so I use cardboard to make trial and error templates.

Posted Image


Comments

  1. Sick skills matx!!! I wish i could do that... =)

    ReplyDelete
  2. This is pretty amazing. I've recently started scratch building and I was hoping you had some advice. I need a way to insure that the holes I drill are at exactly 90 degrees to my piece ( for axles and such). I bought a Dremel Drill press attachment, but the thing isn't at all near accurate. Tips? Thanks alot, and awesome work.

    ReplyDelete
  3. @ rzero1: Thanks, man. You've got skills yourself after all.

    @ Josh: I usually just estimate visually (or you can draw a perpendicular line along the drill direction as a guide), but it's easier to do that with a pin vise. I also have a drill press, but I hardly use it.

    Since I estimate, I do get small misalignments, but I use that to my advantage to help lock the part into place. When placing the pegs, though, I use the square edge of my metal ruler to check it is set perpendicular, and adjust as needed while the cement is still drying.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Demystifying Bosny Spray Cans

MatX's Guide to LED mods

An Objective Review of the Dragon Momoko Tallgeese II